My Blog

Posts for: May, 2014

By Jeffery J. Johnson & Jodi B. Johnson DDS
May 27, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   braces  
KristiYamaguchisBracesHelpedGiveHeraWinningSmile

If Kristi Yamaguchi's kids inherit her figure skating ability, they might just be headed for the Olympics — after all, their mom won the gold medal for figure skating in the 1992 games. When it comes to teeth, however, she wouldn't mind if they inherited her spouse's instead. “My husband [fellow Olympian turned pro hockey player Bret Hedican] never had braces,” she recently told an interviewer. “I'm hoping they get his teeth.”

When you look at the elegant skating star's pearly smile, you'd never suspect she had dental problems. In fact, Kristi had four permanent teeth extracted to relieve the crowding in her mouth. She also wore braces to correct irregularities in both upper and lower teeth. Could orthodontics work the same “magic” for your kids — or yourself?

It just might. The first step toward finding out is having an orthodontic evaluation. For kids, the right time for an initial evaluation is no later than age 7. By then, the first molars are usually present and your child's bite pattern is establishing. Even though treatment may not begin for several more years, it's helpful to know what problems may arise in your child's individual situation — and to start treating them at just the right time.

Orthodontics has progressed a great deal in the two decades since Yamaguchi's braces came off. Today, small devices called palatal expanders are often used to create more space in the mouth, as an alternative to tooth extraction. There are also many new options for orthodontic appliances, in addition to standard metal braces. These include unobtrusive tooth-colored braces and lingual braces, which are applied to the tongue side of the teeth and can't be seen. In some cases, clear plastic aligners can be used instead of braces, for a look that's almost invisible.

Adolescence is often the preferred time to do orthodontic treatment. By then, the permanent teeth have mostly come in, but there's still some growing left to do. But age isn't a factor that should stop you from getting the smile you've always wanted. About one in five orthodontic patients today is an adult — and those less-visible appliances can fit in well with the more “professional” image of an older person.

Orthodontics can't help make someone an Olympic athlete — only lots of talent and practice can do that. But it can make a big difference in a person's appearance. “Once my braces came off, it was like — Wow! That looks so much nicer,” Yamaguchi recollected. And today, the mother of two, author, and philanthropist sports the same appealing smile she had on the podium at the Albertville Olympic Games.

If you would like more information on how orthodontics could help you get the smile you've dreamed about, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Early Orthodontic Evaluation” and “The Magic of Orthodontics.”


By Jeffery J. Johnson & Jodi B. Johnson DDS
May 12, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
FrequentlyAskedQuestionsAboutToothWear

What is tooth wear?
“Tooth wear” refers to a loss of tooth structure that can make your teeth appear shorter or less even than they used to be. Wear starts with loss of outer covering of the teeth, known as enamel. Although enamel is the hardest structure in the human body — even harder than bone — it can wear away over time. If enough enamel is lost, the softer inner tooth structure known as dentin can become exposed, and dentin wears away much faster.

What causes tooth wear?
Tooth wear can be caused by any of the following:

  • Abrasion: This is caused by a rubbing or scraping of the teeth. The most common source of abrasion is brushing too hard or using a toothbrush that is not soft enough. A removable dental appliance, such as a partial dentures or retainer, can also abrade teeth. Abrasion can also result from habits such as nail-biting and pen-chewing.
  • Attrition: This is caused by teeth contacting each other. Habits that you might not even be aware of — such as grinding or clenching your teeth — can be quite destructive over time. That’s because they can subject teeth to 10 times the normal forces of biting and chewing.
  • Erosion: Acid in your diet can actually erode (dissolve) the enamel on your teeth. Many sodas, sports drinks and so-called energy drinks are highly acidic; so are certain fruit juices. Eating sugary snacks also raises the acidity level in your mouth. If you can’t give up these snacks and drinks entirely, it’s best to confine them to mealtimes so your mouth doesn’t stay acidic throughout the day. Swishing water in your mouth after eating or drinking acidic or sugary substances can also help prevent erosion.
  • Abfraction: This refers to the loss of tooth enamel at the “necks” of the teeth (the part right at the gum line). This type of wear is not thoroughly understood, though it is believed to result from excessive biting forces. Abrasion and erosion can contribute to this problem.

How is it treated?
The first step in treating any type of tooth wear is to determine the cause during a simple oral examination right here at the dental office. Once the cause has been identified, we can work together to reduce the stresses on your teeth. For example, you may need a refresher course on gentle, effective brushing techniques; or you might benefit from some changes to your diet. If you have a clenching or grinding habit, we can make you a nightguard that will protect your teeth during sleep or periods of high stress. Once we have dealt with the underlying cause, we can make your teeth look beautiful again by replacing lost tooth structure with bonding, veneers, or crowns. This will also allow your bite to function properly again.

If you have any concerns about tooth wear, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How and Why Teeth Wear.”


By Jeffery J. Johnson & Jodi B. Johnson DDS
May 02, 2014
Category: Oral Health
TVsNateBerkusDiscussesDentalSealantsFluorideTreatmentsandFlossing

Nate Berkus, author, interior designer and host of his own television program, The Nate Berkus Show, is a consummate professional who has always focused on “helping others love the way they live,” as he puts it. Berkus is known as one of America's most beloved go-to-guys for inspiration on the latest design trends. And then there is his captivating smile.

In an exclusive interview with Dear Doctor magazine, Berkus discusses his trademark smile. Unlike most people in Hollywood, his smile is totally natural — he never wore braces or had any cosmetic work. However, Berkus does give credit to his childhood dentist for the preventative healthcare he received as a young boy. Berkus states, “I'm grateful for having been given fluoride treatments and sealants as a child. Healthy habits should start at a young age.”

As for his oral hygiene routine today, Berkus says he brushes his teeth at least two times a day, and sometimes three times a day. Berkus is also an avid “flosser” and follows the important flossing advice he learned from his dentist: “Floss the ones you want to keep.”

In addition to his design expertise, Berkus is right on the mark with his opinions on oral hygiene. In fact, he inspired our office to put together the following list of facts and oral health tips:

  • The first step in improving your oral health is to learn good oral hygiene behavior. Simply put, to maintain optimal oral health, you must brush and floss properly so that you thoroughly remove the dental plaque.
  • The second step is a thorough evaluation system. We are a key part of this step. During your next office visit, we can conduct a thorough examination, review your brushing and flossing techniques, examine the health of your tongue and discuss any questions you have. We can also clean your teeth and ensure that you leave our offices confident with your new oral hygiene routine. And if you don't have an appointment, contact us today to schedule one.

To learn more about improving your oral hygiene, you can continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Hygiene Behavior - Dental Health For Life.” And to read the entire interview with Nate Berkus, please see the article “Nate Berkus.”