My Blog

Posts for: August, 2018

By Jeffery J. Johnson & Jodi B. Johnson DDS
August 21, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
WhyemBigBangTheoryemActressMayimBialikCouldntHaveBraces

Mayim Bialik has spent a good part of her life in front of TV cameras: first as the child star of the hit comedy series Blossom, and more recently as Sheldon Cooper’s love interest — a nerdy neuroscientist — on The Big Bang Theory. (In between, she actually earned a PhD in neuroscience from UCLA…but that’s another story.) As a child, Bialik had a serious overbite — but with all her time on camera, braces were just not an option.

“I never had braces,” she recently told Dear Doctor – Dentistry & Oral Health magazine. “I was on TV at the time, and there weren’t a lot of creative solutions for kids who were on TV.” Instead, her orthodontist managed to straighten her teeth using retainers and headgear worn only at night.

Today, there are several virtually invisible options available to fix orthodontic issues — and you don’t have to be a child star to take advantage of them. In fact, both children and adults can benefit from these unobtrusive appliances.

Tooth colored braces are just like traditional metal braces, with one big difference: The brackets attached to teeth are made from a ceramic material that blends in with the natural color of teeth. All that’s visible is the thin archwire that runs horizontally across the teeth — and from a distance it’s hard to notice. Celebs like Tom Cruise and Faith Hill opted for this type of appliance.

Clear aligners are custom-made plastic trays that fit over the teeth. Each one, worn for about two weeks, moves the teeth just a bit; after several months, you’ll see a big change for the better in your smile. Best of all, clear aligners are virtually impossible to notice while you’re wearing them — which you’ll need to do for 22 hours each day. But you can remove them to eat, or for special occasions. Zac Efron and Katherine Heigl, among others, chose to wear clear aligners.

Lingual braces really are invisible. That’s because they go behind your teeth (on the tongue side), where they can’t be seen; otherwise they are similar to traditional metal braces. Lingual braces are placed on teeth differently, and wearing them often takes some getting used to at first. But those trade-offs are worth it for plenty of people. Which celebs wore lingual braces? Rumor has it that the list includes some top models, a well-known pop singer, and at least one British royal.

So what’s the best way to straighten your teeth and keep the orthodontic appliances unnoticeable? Just ask us! We’d be happy to help you choose the option that’s just right for you. You’ll get an individualized evaluation, a solution that fits your lifestyle — and a great-looking smile!

For more information about hard-to-see (or truly invisible) orthodontics, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Orthodontics for the Older Adult” and “Clear Aligners for Teenagers.”


By Jeffery J. Johnson & Jodi B. Johnson DDS
August 11, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: porcelain veneers  
VeneersmayOfferaLessInvasiveWaytoTransformYourSmile

If your smile is, to put it mildly, “unattractive,” you may think only extensive and expensive dental work can change it. But depending on your teeth’s actual condition, you might be able to obtain a new smile with a less-invasive option: porcelain veneers.

As their name implies, veneers are thin layers of dental porcelain bonded to the front of teeth to cover imperfections. They’re custom designed and manufactured by a dental technician to match the natural color, shape and size of the teeth they’re covering and to blend with neighboring teeth.

Veneers are quite effective for heavily stained, chipped or moderately misaligned teeth that are otherwise healthy. They can even be used to address slight gaps between teeth and restore worn teeth to make them appear larger and more youthful.

Overall, they’re less invasive than other dental restorations. That said, though, most veneers will still require some alteration of the affected teeth. This is because although quite thin they can still appear bulky after they’re bonded to the teeth. We can minimize this by removing a small amount of a tooth’s outer enamel. While this alteration is modest compared to other restorations, it’s nonetheless permanent– your teeth will require some form of restoration from then on.

Veneers also require special consideration while biting. You’ll need to exercise care and avoid biting hard items like candies (or using your teeth as tools) or the veneer could break. Similarly if you have a teeth grinding habit, you may want to consider having a custom guard created that you wear at night to prevent solid contact between your teeth. The excessive force generated while grinding or clenching teeth could also shatter veneers.

Veneers may not be the answer in all cosmetic dental situations, such as extensive disfigurements or bite problems. To know for sure if your particular dental condition could benefit, see your dentist for a complete dental examination and discuss whether obtaining veneers is a viable option for you. If so, you may be able to gain a much more attractive smile from this less invasive but no less effective option.

If you would like more information on porcelain veneers and other dental restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Veneers: Strength & Beauty as Never Before.”


By Jeffery J. Johnson & Jodi B. Johnson DDS
August 09, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  

Root CanalThe American Dental Association (ADA) recommends root canal therapy as a great substitute for dental extraction. Drs. Jeffery and Jodi Johnson offer this pain-free restoration right at their family dentistry practice in St. Louis, MO. They also answer the important question: "Do I need a root canal?"

The details on root canal therapy

Root canal therapy is a restorative treatment that dentists in St. Louis and around the world use to bring sick teeth back to full health and function. The procedure removes the inflamed and diseased pulp from deep within a tooth, including the slender chambers inside each tooth root--hence, the term, "root canal therapy." After the dentist thoroughly cleans out and disinfects the tooth, he or she seals it and crowns it, preserving it for years.

Qualifying for root canal therapy

What signs tell your dentist you may need a root canal? They are different for each patient, but typically, Dr. Johnson sees signs of extreme infection, injury, or deterioration, including:

  • Discharge
  • Pus at the gum line
  • Bad breath, or halitosis
  • A red pimple on the gums
  • Severe toothache pain
  • Extreme dental sensitivity to pressure, cold, heat, or sugar
  • A crack or substantial loss of enamel
  • Lost or deteriorating fillings
  • Darkened enamel

An X-ray confirms if the tooth may be saved with a root canal or if extraction is necessary. Fortunately, most root canal procedures succeed, says the American Association of Endodontists. In other words, you can have a complete set of teeth instead of struggling with smile gaps which harm personal appearance, oral function, jaw bone density, and the position and strength of neighboring teeth.

The procedure

Most root canal patients wish to know if the procedure will hurt and if it will be lengthy. Dr. Johnson wants to assure you that the area around the tooth will be numbed prior to the treatment. The removal of pulp from the canals, sealing them (with biocompatible gutta-percha) and capping the tooth takes two one-hour appointments, separated by a week or so to allow for healing.

After the permanent porcelain crown is placed, you will enjoy a tooth that feels good and looks very natural. Just brush twice a day as you normally would and floss around the tooth to reduce the build-up of plaque and tartar. Of course, see Dr. Johnson twice a year for an examination and professional cleaning.

Find out more

A root canal procedure truly is one of today's most predictable and effective dental procedures. Contact us if you are concerned about a particular tooth, and the office staff will get you into the office for a consultation with Dr. Jeffery Johnson or Dr. Jodi Johnson. Call (314) 427-7400.


By Jeffery J. Johnson & Jodi B. Johnson DDS
August 01, 2018
Category: Oral Health
BeontheAlertforGumDiseaseWhileWearingBraces

On your way to a more attractive smile, you’ll have to deal with some inconveniences while wearing braces like avoiding certain foods or habits or dealing with possible embarrassment about your new “metal smile.” But there’s one consequence of wearing braces that could dramatically affect your dental health: the difficulty they pose for keeping your teeth clean of dental plaque.

Dental plaque is a thin film of bacteria and food particles that if allowed to build up on tooth surfaces could trigger tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease. Brushing and flossing thoroughly every day helps prevent this buildup.

Unfortunately, metal brackets and wires can get in the way and cause you to miss areas while performing these hygiene tasks. This could cause plaque buildup in those isolated areas that could trigger an infection. And if you (or someone you love) are also a teenager, the natural adolescent surge in hormones can increase your infection risk.

If while wearing braces you notice your gums are reddened, swollen or bleeding when you brush, these are all signs of infection and the body’s inflammatory response to it. The longer the infection continues, the weaker the tissues become, causing them to gradually detach from the teeth. Along with bone deterioration (another effect of the disease), this can ultimately lead to tooth loss.

To prevent this from happening, you’ll need to be as thorough as possible with daily brushing and flossing. To help make it easier, you can use special tools like an interproximal brush that can maneuver around the braces better than a regular brush. For flossing you can use a floss threader to more readily guide floss between teeth or a water flosser that uses a pressurized stream of water rather than floss thread to remove plaque.

This extra cleaning effort while wearing braces can greatly reduce your disease risk. But you’ll still need to keep an eye out for any symptoms like swollen or bleeding gums, and see your dentist as soon as possible. If the symptoms become severe you may need your braces removed until the disease can be brought under control. The health and future vitality of your teeth and gums is what’s of primary importance.

If you would like more information on dental care while wearing braces, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Gum Swelling During Orthodontics.”